Taku Sugimoto/Taku Unami Tengu et Kitsune 2 (slub)

I was a pretty big fan of the original Tengu et Kitsune so of course I had to pick up the follow up. This release features two tracks of 22′ and 26′ respectively. The first track is made up of rattles from Unami’s computer driven motors and devices and Sugimoto operating metronomes that gives the proceedings a rather interlocking mechanical feel. It somewhat evokes the clockwork’s of Ryu Hankil but not nearly as as interesting to these ears. It also evokes some the process pieces from the sixties especially György Ligeti’s Poème Symphonique For 100 Metronomes. I’m not sure if its based on a score but it doesn’t really seem so to me. Perhaps a very loose one, with instructions to just play at certain times. Anyway all things considered its not bad, if nothing earth shattering. I do rather like mechanical type sounds like this but I feel that the density at times mars the piece, if anything it could have used a bit more of the trademark Sugimoto space,

The second track is from six months later and seems to reflect a slight shift in direction as at least the reports of Unami in performance over the last six months seem to be in line with this performance. It is again focused on rhythmic structures but instead of the mechanical processes used in the first track it is mandolin and sounds that can be generated with the body. The mandolin playing is mostly broken chords, repeated rhythmic strumming and here and there, fragments of melodies. The other sounds are mainly handclaps though tapping the bodies of their instruments and tongue clicks feature as well. It seems to be an attempt to replicate the mechanical rythems of the first track naturally, perhaps even following the same loose structure. However these methods work a lot less convincingly then the first track mainly in the lack of precision. It could be deliberate or an element that they wished to incorporate but I was pretty unimpressed by the inconsistencies of their rhythms and the sounds themselves. I should note that it is definitely the rhythmic failures that make this less interesting, as failure in technique has long been a fasciation for me. That is to say the accidental events that occur that lead to different sounds are something I’ve exploited a lot. In fact I’ve even worked with failure in rhythmic structures with my Book of Musical Patterns and this is perhaps an insight into what would happen if someone chose to play those patterns very fast. Perhaps in the end I’m just not that interested in hearing handclaps and half assed mandolin melodies?

One of Sugimoto’s smartest moves is that he only really hints at what his point is in all of this. He is not like Mattin, who is right out there saying what exactly it is he is challenging. This almost always proves to be to the detriment of his activities as his challenges are almost always strawmen: he is railing against a situation that doesn’t really exist (see this post for a perfect example of this). Sugimoto for all we know could be just doing that but he doesn’t make dramatic public statements or issue manifestos, he simply does his show and puts out the occasional recorded documentation of it. Almost all of the assessments of what he is doing (and Unami as well, but I think he is mostly following Sugimoto’s lead in this) are pretty much conjecture, I don’t think we’ve had much of a statement from him since the beginning of his extreme silence phase. I tend to think these two (again Unami following Sugimoto) as trickster figures involved in a continuing commentary on improvised music and its audience.